News

Data Driven Decision Making: Empowering Farmers in a Changing Climate

By Lulu Chen, Intern at the AgAID Institute, Washington State University Can data be a game changer for farmers in the face of climate change? Farmers are at the forefront of risk and uncertainty in the face of a rapidly changing environment. Irregular weather patterns, severe temperatures, and shifting precipitation levels create significant challenges to […]

Image of ones and zeros forming a tunnel wall

Pairing Solar Power and Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest

By Morgan Lawrence, USDA Northwest Climate Hub Climate change has caused unprecedented warming, varying precipitation patterns, and higher risks of drought and wildfires across the Northwest. These impacts threaten agriculture, natural resources, and human health in the region. Transitioning from fossil fuels to renewable forms of energy can reduce carbon emissions and slow the effects […]

Categories: General
Row of a cucurbit crop alongside row of solar panels

Does Pacific Northwest-Sourced Biochar Have a Future as a Soil Amendment in Annual Cropping Systems?

By Doug Finkelnburg, University of Idaho Extension I recently had the pleasure of attending and presenting at the “Making and Using Biochar” workshop hosted by my colleague and Area Forestry Extension Educator Chris Schnepf in Sandpoint, Idaho. The program was designed to give foresters, forest owners, and agriculturists an introduction to biochar in forestry and […]

Workers removing charcoal-like material from a trailer with a large, covered metal container

Protecting the Land that Feeds Us and Mitigates Climate Change

By Andrea Krahmer and Nellie McAdams, Oregon Agricultural Trust            From wine grapes to cattle and hay, Oregon produces more than 220 different crop and livestock products. About one-quarter of Oregon’s land base (16 million acres) is in agricultural production, and these lands provide opportunities for carbon sequestration and resilient food systems in the face of […]

Overhead view of green pastures, hills and pond.

Implications of Shifting Timing in Water Availability in Eastern Washington

By Aaron Whittemore, Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources, Washington State University The Columbia River Basin has grappled with limited water supplies for decades. This was most noticeable during 2015, when we experienced severe summertime drought across large areas of Washington State, which reduced the amount of water available to meet the region’s demands. […]

Side of irrigation canal with intake to the pump, dry above the level of the water

Check It Out: Cooling Queens Helps Them Survive the Hot Summers

By Lulu Chen, Intern at the AgAID Institute, Washington State University Warmer summers brought on by climate change pose a unique difficulty for beekeepers. However, a recent study by Washington State University suggests a viable remedy. The study looks into the practice of “queen banking,” which involves keeping extra queens for use in the future. […]

Bee flying towards a white flower.

Can Baby Kangaroos Help Address Climate Change?

By Katie Doonan, Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources, Washington State University Okay, okay- while baby kangaroos singlehandedly solving climate change is out of the question, the potential for baby kangaroo droppings to help decrease methane emissions is an exciting prospect! Methane from ruminant digestion is a significant contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in […]

Female kangaroo grazing, with joey in pouch

Progress in Applying a Multi-Model Ensemble Approach to Soil Carbon

By David I Gustafson, Adjunct Research Faculty at Washington State University When it comes to climate adaptation and mitigation opportunities in agriculture, few (if any) are of greater importance than practices that sequester more soil carbon, which can directly reduce the heat-trapping effects of atmospheric CO2. Boosting soil carbon also has multiple direct benefits for […]

Flowering potato crop, with center pivot across the background